If you have doubts about the future generation, this past weekend should eliminate those worries.

Yakima's March for Our Lives event proved that -- it was organized by students, led by students and all the speakers were students. At the march I spoke with a few of these bright stars. (See video above.)

These "kids" as we like to refer to them, marched in all 50 states as well as multiple countries.

Even little old Yakima held a march that started at Millennium Plaza with a few hundred people in attendance.

My kids and I attended, too. They made signs. They marched at the front with all the other students.

When we left, my 11-year-old Shaylee said, "I feel powerful!"

I grew up not having to worry about school shootings. The most we had to deal with was fire and earthquake drills, and if you would get bullied that day. That's it. Not "Will today be the day that someone comes in with a gun to my school?" I have no clue what today's students feel like having to bear this burden every day.

It's sad to think that all of my kids, including my 21- and 19-year-old have never known a world without school shootings.

And every time one happens, we talk about it. We talk about the lockdown drills they have at school. They run down what they need to do if, heaven forbid, something ever happens at their school.

My 13-year-old, Jackson, who is taller than me now, mentioned during the last discussion we had after the Florida school shooting that he would try to stop the shooter. As a parent, my heart stopped for a moment. In one breath, I'm proud that I raised a thoughtful child who would give his life to save others. But the odds that my child would survive against a shooter are slim. The internal struggle began on whether to tell him that no, I didn't want him to try to stop or the shooter (which is selfish of me) or to let him try.

The crazy thing is, we shouldn't even need to be discussing this! They shouldn't need to worry day in and day out if today will be the day!

They feel powerless every day, but for one day they felt powerful. They were engaged. They are our future, which looked pretty bright from where I was standing Saturday.